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Explain how choice theories of crime affect society
Weegy: "In criminology, the Rational Choice Theory adopts a Utilitarian belief that man is a reasoning actor who weighs means and ends, costs and benefits, [ and makes a rational choice." This is to say that individuals will consider the crime and consequence and weigh the outcome to either participating in the criminal act or not. Two obvious examples of how committing the crime far outweighs not committing it, is where economical and safety needs are not being met. A person may decide to steal food rather than go hungry or steal money from their job rather than go without electricity. On a more serious account, consider battered woman syndrome that may drive a wife to kill her husband rather than fear the next moment in life with him. The Choice Theory would quite obviously affect how society would deter criminal acts differently than the trait theory. Under this school of thought crime deterrent would be a punishment that is less appealing. This would deter the accused criminal from repeating the offense and deter others from attempting criminal activity. ] (More)
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Asked 6/17/2011 10:31:11 AM
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Describe the common models for society to determine which acts are considered criminal
Weegy: kindly check this link.. [ ] [smile] User: Describe the common models for society to determine which acts are considered criminal (More)
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Updated 10/18/2011 8:00:29 PM
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Describe the common models for society to determine which acts are considered criminal
Added 10/18/2011 8:00:29 PM
describe choice theories User: wha are choice theories and how do they relate to crime
Weegy: The classical school of criminology founded by CESARE BECCARIA (1738-1794) was enormously influential, especially in the field of criminal justice policy, despite being neglected by criminologists for many years, [ particularly during much of the 20th century, until James Q. Wilson's 1975 book Thinking About Crime came to symbolize renewed interest in classical ideas and Roshier's (1989) book Controlling Crime came to symbolize the neoclassicist (postclassicist) movement. To be sure, most criminologists (perhaps at least 60% or so) still embrace positivism, parts of it, or the idea that people are sometimes influenced by structural and/or external forces beyond their control (radical/conflict criminology makes the fullest break in this regard). By contrast, classical criminology -- from which choice theories are derived -- holds some core ideas which include: (1) people freely choose all their behavior; that motives such as greed, revenge, need, anger, lust, jealousy, thrill-seeking, and vanity are just expressions of free will or at least expressions of personal choice, conclusion, or decisionmaking that people have made; (2) choices can be controlled by fear of punishment; because people weigh the potential benefits and consequences of crime, some people concluding that the risk of punishment is worth the satisfaction of crime; and (3) the more certain, swift, and severe the punishment, the greater is its ability to control criminal behavior, especially if the punishment is fair and serves some rational and legitimate purpose (a tangible incentive to obey the law). Although it all seems rather elegant and simple, research on the core principles has produced mixed results (Siegel 2006), and there are theoretical as well as empirical problems, discussed below. ] (More)
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Asked 6/17/2011 10:44:50 AM
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